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A-1J Skyraider

Notes: The A-1 began life as a late-World War 2 US Navy dive-bomber. It continued service in Korea, and in Vietnam as a "Sandy" (an aircraft used in support of shot-down aircrews and their rescue helicopters). By the Twilight War, very few of these aircraft were flying, but the few remaining -- perhaps 25 in all -- were recalled late in the war as ground support aircraft and Sandies. This aircraft was also flown by Vietnam (captured at the end of the Vietnam War), and France. The Skyraider is known for being tough and mechanically reliable, and able to haul a large weapon load. Note on weapon load: 4 hardpoints on each wing are limited-load points. If loaded with more than 250 kg of weapons, the pilot may load only every other of these hardpoints. The aircraft has no ejection seat, though a rocket extraction device is available (bailout attempt one level easier). It is not capable of in-flight refueling.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$265,759

AvG

3.63 tons

11.34 tons

1

10

None

Enclosed

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

1104

276 (100)

NA 69 10/5 70/35

1475

1033

7740

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

None

615/745m Primitive Runway

+1

4x20mm M3 Autocannons, 15 Hardpoints

600x20mm

A-4 Skyhawk

Notes: Most versions of the A-4 have a hump behind the cockpit that houses avionics and ECM gear. Although it is small, it can carry a large weapon load for its size, including nuclear weapons. These aircraft were much used in the Twilight War, particularly in the Middle East and by the US, who recalled them from boneyards to replace aircraft losses and to use as close support aircraft.

The A-4A was the first production model, with a low-thrust engine and two hardpoints. The A-4B is the same aircraft with a slightly higher-powered engine. The A-4Q is a refurbished A-4B sold to the Argentine Navy. The A-4C has the addition of terrain-following radar and an autopilot as well as improvements to avionics. The A-4P is a refurbished A-4C supplied to the Argentine Air Force.

The A-4E introduced two new hardpoints to the wings. The A-4F introduced the avionics hump to the rear of the cockpit, housing ECM and equipment for the guidance of command-guided munitions. An A-4G is an A-4F built for the Australian Navy; it does not have the hump. The A-4K is the same aircraft after some years have gone by; it was refurbished, and then passed on the New Zealanders. The A-4H was built for the Israelis; it replaces the cannons with heavier ones. The A-4M was built for the US Marines and was known as the Skyhawk II; it has a more powerful engine, double the cannon ammunition load, and a laser designator. The A-4N was built for the Israelis; it has 30mm cannons, and more advanced avionics. The A-4Y is an A-4M with a refit to bring it up to the same level as the A-4N.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

A-4A

$1,318,657

AvG

3.59 tons

10.23 tons

1

18

Radar

Shielded

A-4B/Q/S

$1,419,574

AvG

3.59 tons

10.23 tons

1

18

Radar

Shielded

A-4C/P

$1,465, 367

AvG

3.59 tons

10.23 tons

1

18

Radar

Shielded

A-4E

$1,613,332

AvG

4.5 tons

11.14 tons

1

18

Radar

Shielded

A-4F/K

$3,211,715

AvG

4.5 tons

11.14 tons

1

20

Radar

Shielded

A-4G

$3,038,053

AvG

4.5 tons

11.14 tons

1

18

Radar

Shielded

A-4H

$3,258,797

AvG

4.5 tons

11.14 tons

1

22

Radar

Shielded

A-4M

$4,044,171

AvG

4.76 tons

11.14 tons

1

26

Radar

Shielded

A-4N/Y

$4,021,941

AvG

4.76 tons

11.14 tons

1

26

Radar

Shielded

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

A-4A

2115

529 (110)

NA 132 7/4 70/40

3120

1610

17100

A-4B/Q/S/C/P

2125

531 (110)

NA 133 7/4 70/40

3120

1647

17100

A-4E/F/K/G/H

2154

538 (110)

NA 135 7/4 70/40

3120

1908

17100

A-4H

2832

596 (110)

NA 149 7/4 70/40

3120

1932

17100

A-4M/N/Y

3097

774 (110)

NA 194 7/4 70/40

3120

2635

17100

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

A-4A/B/Q/S

None

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+1

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 2 Hardpoints

200x20mm

A-4C/P

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+1

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 2 Hardpoints

200x20mm

A-4E/G

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR, ECM

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+1

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 4 Hardpoints

200x20mm

A-4F/K

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR, ECM, DJM

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+2

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 4 Hardpoints

200x20mm

A-4H

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR, ECM, DJM, IR Masking

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+2

2x30mm DEFA Autocannons, 4 Hardpoints

200x30mm

A-4M

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR, ECM, DJM, Laser Designator

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+3

4x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 5 Hardpoints

400x20mm

A-4N/Y

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, TFR, ECM, DJM, Laser Designator

1000/600m Hardened Runway

+3

2x30mm DEFA Autocannons, 5 Hardpoints

100x30mm

A-6 Intruder

Notes: This is an older US Navy attack aircraft, partially replaced in US Navy service by the F/A-18. The Intruder can be refueled in flight and can carry drop tanks. Earlier versions of this aircraft were workhorses in Vietnam and the Gulf War, and many returned to duty to replace aircraft losses in the Twilight War. A tanker version, the KA-6D, remains in service, and carries 9500 liters of fuel in 5 drop tanks for buddy refueling of carrier aircraft.

The A-6A is the basic aircraft; it to include a digital integrated attack suite (the DIANE system). The A-6B is generally similar, but has an updated radar warning receiver and is able to use antiradiation missiles. The A-6C is also similar to the A-6B, but carries a FLIR and low-light TV system under the nose. The A-6E has a comprehensive avionics and ECM suite. The A-6E/TRAM has the TRAM system; this includes a steerable ball turret under the nose housing the FLIR, LLTV, and a laser designator. This aircraft is one of the few in the inventory able to deliver Tomahawk cruise missiles, or anything else in the US Naval inventory.

The A-6F Intruder II aircraft was at first not going to be produced, but with the Twilight War emergency, it was produced in limited quantities (per haps 50, plus about 25 conversions from A-6E aircraft) during 1998-99. The A-6F includes better avionics, smokeless engines, higher load-carrying capability, and a new bomb delivery system with better accuracy. In addition, the A-6F adds air-to-air capability.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

A-6A/B

$6,858,191

AvG

8.17 tons

26.58 tons

2

38

Radar

Shielded

A-6C

$8,047,949

AvG

8.17 tons

26.78 tons

2

38

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

A-6E

$9,704,795

AvG

8.17 tons

27.4 tons

2

40

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

A-6E/TRAM

$11,188,091

AvG

8.17 tons

27.4 tons

2

38

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

A-6F

$12,146,506

AvG

8.55 tons

27.5 tons

2

40

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

A-6A/B/C/E

2072

1518 (185)

NA 130 8/4 40/30

7300

4898

12925

A-6F

2447

611 (135)

NA 153 8/4 50/30

9600

7417

13500

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

A-6A/B

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, RWR, All Weather Flight

1400/785 Hardened Runway

+2

5 Hardpoints

None

A-6C

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, RWR, All Weather Flight, Inertial Navigation

1400/785 Hardened Runway

+3

5 Hardpoints

None

A-6E

EW Suite, Secure Radios, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Radar Warning, Deception Jamming, All-Weather Flight, Inertial Navigation

1400/785 Hardened Runway

+3

5 Hardpoints

None

A-6E/TRAM

EW Suite, Secure Radios, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Radar Warning, Deception Jamming, All-Weather Flight, Laser Designator, Inertial Navigation

1400/785 Hardened Runway

+4

5 Hardpoints

None

A-6F

EW Suite, Secure Radios, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Radar Warning Receiver, Active Jamming, All-weather Flight, HUD, IR Uncage, Track While Scan, Terrain Following Radar, Laser Designator, Inertial Navigation

1400/785m Hardened Runway

+5

7 Hardpoints

None

A-7 Corsair II

Notes: This strike aircraft is no longer in active service with the US, but equips the armed forces of Greece, Thailand, and Portugal. Two of its hardpoints can carry drop tanks, and the two fuselage hardpoints may carry only Sidewinder missiles. The Corsair II is capable of in-flight refueling through a nose probe, and the pilot has an ejection seats. Though the Corsair II was not in active service with the US Navy and Air Force at the beginning of the Twilight War, some of them were recalled from the boneyards to replace aircraft losses.

The A-7A was the initial production version for the US Navy. The A-7B had a new, more powerful engine. The A-7C was an interim model for the US Navy and Marines until the A-7E was available; it had the same engine as the A-7B, but uses the radar, bomb system, ECM, and cannon of the A-7E. The A-7D introduced leading edge "dogfight" slats for improved maneuverability at low speeds, used a more powerful engine, and added a capability for in-flight refueling, as well as the laser designator and Vulcan cannon. (This was the production model for the US Air Force). The A-7E was the final model for US forces; it further increased the engine power, added a FLIR, and more powerful ECM. The A-7H is a land-based version of the A-7E for the Hellenic Air Force. The A-7P is a refurbished A-7A with the engine of an A-7B and the radar and bomb system of the A-7E, for the Portuguese Air Force.

The A-7F Corsair Plus is also known as the Strikefighter. The A-7F is an elongated Corsair with a more powerful afterburning engine. This improves speed and lifting capability. The aircraft is a better strike aircraft, and a capable fighter. This aircraft was produced mainly for the US Air National Guard units in some states, and few of them were built at that (perhaps 150 of them).

The two hardpoints on the sides of the fuselage may only be used for air-to-air missiles or the Sidearm ARM.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

A-7A

$2,678,143

AvG

4.54 tons

16 tons

1

20

Radar

Enclosed

A-7B

$2,721,538

AvG

6.8 tons

18.2 tons

1

22

Radar

Enclosed

A-7C

$3,016,760

AvG

6.8 tons

18 tons

1

24

Radar

Enclosed

A-7D

$3,337,951

AvG

6.8 tons

18.5 tons

1

26

Radar, FLIR

Enclosed

A-7E/H

$4,301,522

AvG

6.8 tons

19.05 tons

1

28

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Enclosed

A-7F

$4,800,000

AvG

8.16 tons

21.06 tons

1

32

Radar, FLIR, Image Intensification

Enclosed

A-7P

$1,500,774

AvG

6.8 tons

17 tons

1

22

Radar

Enclosed

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

A-7A

2186

546 (160)

NA 273 8/5 40/30

5600

2665

13700

A-7B/C/P

2230

558 (160)

NA 139 8/5 40/30

5600

3582

13700

A-7D/E/H

2246

562 (140)

NA 140 8/5 50/40

5600

4502

13700

A-7F

2880

720 (140)

NA 180 8/5 50/40

6600

9887

15250

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

A-7A/B

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, RWR, ECM

1200/800m Hardened Runway

+1

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 8 Hardpoints

800x20mm

A-7C/E/H

Secure Radios, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Radar Warning, All Weather Flight, Laser Designator

1200/800m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan, 8 hardpoints

1032x20mm

A-7D

Secure Radios, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Radar Warning, All Weather Flight, Laser Designator

1200/800m Hardened Runway

+2

20mm Vulcan, 8 hardpoints

1032x20mm

A-7P

Secure Radios, RWR, All-Weather Flight, Laser Designator

1200/800m Hardened Runway

+3

2x20mm Mk 12 Autocannons, 8 Hardpoints

800x20mm

A-10 Thunderbolt II

Notes: The A-10 is heavily armored and carries a massive amount of ordinance to a long range. It is an ugly aircraft, and was quickly nicknamed the Warthog by its crews, and acquired a great reputation for tank-busting and general ground support during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 and the Twilight War. The A-10 may be refueled in air, and has an ejection seat. The A-10 is flown only by the US and South Korea.

The A-10 N/AW (or A-10B) is a version of the A-10 that addresses the A-10's greatest shortcoming, the lack of night attack capability. The A-10 NAW has night vision and terrain-following radar for treetop navigation. This aircraft was very rare in the Twilight War, perhaps 50 being modified from existing A-10 aircraft, and being deployed to the American Southwest.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

A-10A

$1,042,518

AvG

7.26 tons

22.68 tons

1

32

None

Shielded

A-10B N/AW

$2,425,613

AvG

7.26 tons

24.15 tons

   

FLIR, Radar, Image Intensification

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

(Both)

1412

353 (90)

NA 88 9/6 50/40

4850

8094

10700

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

Armament

RF

Ammo

A-10A

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, IR Suppression, Laser Designator, HUD, Armored Fuselage

440/400m Primitive Runway

GAU-8 Autocannon, 11 Hardpoints

+3

1174x30mm

A-10B N/AW

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, IR Suppression, Laser Designator, Terrain Following Radar, HUD, Armored Fuselage

440/400m Primitive Runway

GAU-8 Autocannon, 11 Hardpoints

+3

1174x30mm

A-37B Dragonfly

Notes: This attack aircraft was developed from a trainer, the T-37, in the late 1960s. It is not used by the US, but is used by Chile, Columbia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, South Korea, Peru, El Salvador, Thailand, Uruguay, and Vietnam. It may be refueled in air, and has ejection seats.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

A-37B

$227,125

AvG

1.86 tons

6.35 tons

2

10

None

Enclosed

OA-37B

$339,559

AvG

1.86 tons

6.39 tons

2

10

FLIR

Enclosed

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

(Both)

1632

408 (100)

NA 102 8/5 40/30

2000

2538

12730

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

None

550/495m Primitive Runway

+2

M-134 Minigun, 8 Hardpoints

800x7.62mm

None

550/495m Primitive Runway

+2

M-134 Minigun, 8 Hardpoints

800x7.62mm

AC-47 Spooky

Notes: This was one of the first gunships, being built in the Vietnam War on the airframe of the C-47 cargo aircraft. By 2000, the Spooky was primarily flown by Third world nations such as those in Southeast Asia who were allied with the US during that war or by Vietnam, who captured many of them. The aircraft is modified by having three M-134 Miniguns firing out the port side, two through windows and one through the open cargo door. The aircraft is also equipped with flares equivalent to 105mm howitzer ILLUM rounds, which are dropped out the open cargo door. Some of these aircraft have been spotted in use in the United States against New America and Mexican troops, probably taken from boneyards.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$414,582

AvG

750 kg

10.75 tons

5

12

Image Intensification

Enclosed

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

736

184 (80)

NA 46 4/2 40/20

1500

884

7315

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

Flare/Chaff Dispensers

600/500m Primitive Runway

+1

3xM-134 Miniguns

24,000x7.62mm, 45xFlares

AC-130U Spectre

Notes: This aircraft is a development of a number of Vietnam-era experiments with arming transport aircraft for ground attack purposes. The AC-130U is a development on the C-130 Hercules airframe, and is heavily armed with weapons on stabilized mounts. All weapons fire from the left side of the aircraft, and weapons are computer-synchronized to fire at the same aiming point, or they may be aimed independently at different targets. The aircraft has no ejection seats, but is capable of in-flight refueling.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$20,959,144

AvG

1.4 tons

63.6 tons

14

64

FLIR, SLIR, Radar

Enclosed

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

1288

322 (90)

NA 81 5/3 35/20

24000

5512

9315

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

Laser Designator, ECM/IRCM, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, IR Suppression, Secure Radios

1105/800 Primitive Runway

+4

2x20mm Vulcan, 40mm Bofors L70, 105mm Howitzer

3600x20mmVul, 480x40mm, 24x105mm

B-1B Lancer

Notes: This heavy bomber was originally designed in the mid-1970s to replace the B-52 in the long-range bombing role. Rapidly escalating costs eventually led to its cancellation under the Carter administration, but the program was reinstated under the subsequent Reagan presidency, where more development was done that led to the B-1B variant. Later, the Lancer was modified for use with conventional weapons; previously, the B-1B was capable of delivering only cruise missiles and nuclear-equipped SRAMs. These aircraft excelled at the low-level deep penetration raids for which they were designed, and were responsible for a lot of damage to targets ranging from Europe to the Middle East to Southeast Asia, as well as flying missions over the North American continent. However, the gradual loss of suitable airfields and support facilities, the reduction in available jet fuel, and combat losses meant that its use decreased steadily in the later stages of the Twilight War; though some 40 Lancers survived the Twilight War, it is believed that the last B-1B mission was flown in mid-1999. The B-1B has stealth characteristics; it was not designed for stealth deliberately, but is rather a consequence of its design that it presents a radar-cross-section only 1% of the size of the B-52 it was designed to replace. Detection or guidance attempts by radar are one level more difficult than normal. In addition to a large amount of chaff bundles and flares, the B-1B carries 10 chaff rockets; these are fired from the aircraft and spread chaff behind them for a distance of 9 kilometers. They have the equivalent of three ECM devices and two IRCM devices to jam a wide range of transmissions and emissions.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$76,972,805

AvG

34.02 tons

216.37 tons

4

58

Radar, SLAR, RLR, FLIR, LIDAR, Image Intensification

Shielded

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

2648

662 (130)

NA 166 5/3 50/30

130000

21604

15250

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

All-Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers (50), Chaff Rockets (10), ECM, IRCM, IR Suppression, Deception Jamming, Active Jamming, Terrain-Following Radar, Track While Scan, Laser Designator, Inertial Navigation, GPS, Radar Warning Receiver, Secure Radios, Satcom Radio, Target ID, Look-Down Radar, Synthetic Aperture Radar

1800/2200m Hardened Runway

+4

3 Bomb Bays, 20mm Vulcan (Rear)

2000x20mm

B-2 Spirit

Notes: Research on this aircraft began in the late 1970s, but its existence was still only a rumor until just after the start of the Twilight War, when an NBC news camera crew shot some footage at Diego Garcia and caught the first public sight of the strange-looking aircraft, which the President later confirmed was the rumored "Stealth Bomber." These aircraft were used to penetrate heavy defenses all over the globe. They take a different approach to stealth than the F-117A Nighthawk, using a totally smooth and rounded design with almost no protruding surfaces to reflect radar. In addition, the exhaust is routed through cooling channels and thermal bricks to drastically lower the IR signature. This means that whether the enemy is trying to detect the B-2 or trying to guide a weapon to the B-2 by radar, the attempt is four levels more difficult than it would be against a conventional aircraft. If using IR means, the attempts are 3 levels harder than normal. These attempts are two levels easier in any phase that the B-2ís bomb bay doors are open. In addition, the B-2 is liberally equipped with ECM, IRCM, DJM, and AJM features that make the aircraft even more difficult to detect and intercept. The chaff used by the B-2 is similar to that used by the Eurofighter; it actively broadcasts jamming signals, and functions one level better in effectiveness than normal chaff. Unfortunately, due to its design, the B-2 is not an agile aircraft, nor is it a fast aircraft, though it is fuel efficient.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$181,050,240

AvG

18.14 tons

152.64 tons

2

47

Radar, SLAR, RLR, FLIR, LIDAR, Image Intensification

Shielded

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

1528

382 (140)

NA 96 4/2 40/20

93000

31388

16000

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

All-Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers (60), Chaff rockets (12), ECM, IRCM, Deception Jamming, Active Jamming, Terrain-Following Radar, Track While Scan, Laser Designator, Inertial Navigation, GPS, Radar Warning Receiver, Secure Radios, Satcom Radio, Target ID, Look-Down Radar, Synthetic Aperture Radar

1600/2000m Hardened Runway

+5

2 Bomb Bays

None

*The B-2 has no tail or vertical stabilizer surfaces. Any tail hits are considered misses.

B-52H Stratofortress

Notes: Known affectionately to its crews as the BUFF (Big Ugly Fat Fellow, or Big Ugly Fat *Unprintable*), the B-52ís design goes back to the late 1940s, when plans for a heavy, turboprop-powered intercontinental bomber were drawn up. The engines were quickly replaced with what were then 8 of the most powerful jet engines available, and in the intervening years, the design has been steadily upgraded with a stronger frame and skin, ever-more powerful electronics and bomb-delivery equipment, rebuilds to allow the carriage of heavier and more versatile weapons, and an upgraded rear gun position. Over the years, it was supposed to be replaced by a variety of newer bombers, including the B-58 Hustler, the XB-70 Valkyrie, and the B-1 Lancer, but it has outlasted any aircraft ever built. (Before the Twilight War, it was expected to soldier on until at least 2040!) By the Twilight War, the only official service variant was the B-52H, with a fully modern electronic warfare suite and modernized attack center able to conduct both low-level penetration missions and high-altitude bombing with anything from conventional iron bombs to air-launched cruise missiles. In the Twilight War, they are perhaps best known for the bombing of the Krefeld Salient, where, despite staggering losses, they were able to break the back of the Russian invasion of Germany; and the carpet bombing of Baghdad and the surrounding area, practically reducing the Iraqi capital to total ruins along with most of the Republican Guard in a single 22-hour campaign of non-stop bombing. Perhaps the greatest failing of the B-52 is its large radar-cross section; enemy forces using radar to detect the B-52 get a +4 bonus, while attempting to guide weapons to the B-52 by radar gain a +2 bonus. Another failing of the B-52 is the amount of maintenance required by its eight jet engines. The massive single bomb bay may carry 24.56 tons; however, the B-52H may also use 4 hardpoints on its wings. The two inboard hardpoints under its wings may carry ordinance; the two hardpoints near the ends of its wings may only carry drop tanks, and normally carry very massive fuel tanks designed specifically for the B-52. These fuel hardpoints may carry 2880-liter tanks weighing 2.72 tons full, or 11700-liter tanks weighing 9.07 tons each when full.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$59,876,687

AvG

31.75 tons

220.09 tons

5+1

93

Radar, SLAR, RLR, FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

1916

479 (130)

NA 120 4/2 40/20

250000

56433

16765

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

All-Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers (50), Chaff Rockets (10), ECM, IRCM, Deception Jamming, Active Jamming, Terrain-Following Radar, Track While Scan, Inertial Navigation, GPS, Radar Warning Receiver, Secure Radios, Satcom Radio, Target ID, Look-Down Radar, Synthetic Aperture Radar

2200/2600m Hardened Runway

+4

One Bomb Bay, 4 Hardpoints (2 for Drop Tanks Only), 20mm Vulcan (Rear)

2000x20mm

F-15E Strike Eagle

Notes: This version of the F-15 air superiority fighter was adopted by the USAF in 1984, and gave a stellar performance in the 1991 Gulf War and in the Twilight War. The Strike Eagle features new engines, navigation/attack pods under the intakes, and new skin for less radar observability. The Strike Eagle also has standard fit conformal FAST (Fuel and Sensor Tactical) pods fitted beside each intake that can carry up to 1000 kg of fuel and/or sensors, designators, or ECM/IRCM devices. The crewmembers have ejection seats, and the aircraft is capable of in-flight refueling. In addition to the US Air Force, the Strike Eagle is used by Israel and Saudi Arabia. The Strike Eagle retains its air-to-air capability, and is capable of delivering nuclear weapons.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

F100-PW-220 Engines

$6,110,375

AvG

11 tons

36.74 tons

2

32

Radar, FLIR, Thermal Imaging, Image Intensification

Shielded

F100-PW-290 Engines

$6,485,568

AvG

11 tons

36.74 tons

2

37

Radar, FLIR, Thermal Imaging, Image Intensification

Shielded

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

F100-PW-220 Engines

5280

1320 (130)

NA 330 10/7 100/70

13300

19390

18290

F100-PW-290 Engines

5888

1472 (130)

NA 368 10/7 100/70

13300

25159

18290

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

(Both)

Secure Radios, Chaff/Flare Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, Deception Jamming, Auto Track, HUD, IR Uncage, Look-Down Radar, TFR, Track While Scan, All Weather Flight, Target ID

2800/1055m Hardened Runway

+4

20mm Vulcan, 13 Hardpoints

950x20mmM61

F-19A Ghostrider

Notes: This stealth aircraft, rumored but rarely seen, is a second-generation stealth aircraft used by the US for reconnaissance and attack of highly defended targets. It was rarely flown from base to base for security reasons, but was often delivered to bases inside a C-5 Galaxy cargo aircraft. The aircraft has flat bottom, blended wings, advanced ECM, and construction of radar-absorbent materials. Weapons are carried in internal bays and do not contribute to drag. The aircraft's stealth features mean that attempts to guide radar missiles, as well as attempts to detect it with radar, are four levels more difficult. (If a weapon bay is open, attempts are two levels more difficult.) Attempts to detect it with IR, and guide IR missiles to it, are three levels more difficult. Unlike the F-117A, the F-19A has an air-to-air capability.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$13,519,570

AvG

2.95 tons

35 tons

1

36

Radar, Image Intensification, FLIR

Shielded

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

2108

527 (185)

NA 132 5/4 50/40

4800

8647

18300

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Auto Track, HUD, IR Uncage, Look-Down Radar, Terrain Following Radar, Track While Scan, Target ID

1200/1500m Primitive Runway

+5

20mm Vulcan, 6 Weapon Bays

600x20mm

F-105 Thunderchief

Notes: This aircraft was designed from the outset for tactical bombing missions, including nuclear bombing. It was not designed for maneuverability, just speed, range, and the ability to carry a nuclear weapon. This led to a great many nicknames, such as Lead Sled, Ultra Hog, Flying Speedbrake, and the favorite, Thud. The Thunderchief was a star in the bombing campaign against North Vietnam during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Flown only by the US Air Force and Air National Guard, the Thunderchiefs were retired in 1984, but some 100 were pulled from boneyards starting in 1997, refurbished, and sent back into combat. The Thunderchief has in its belly an internal bomb bay; this bay can carry 1.36 tons of weapons, but this was much more likely in operational use to carry a 1500-liter fuel tank. If the fuel tank is carried, a centerline hardpoint may be used. (EF-105s do not have this option; the bomb bay space is taken up with an extra crewmember and electronics.)

The F-105A was only a prototype; soon after testing was complete, a new, more powerful engine was available, and the new F-105B became the first production aircraft. The AF-105C was a proposed two-seat trainer, which was never put into production. The F-105D was the configuration that most in which most Thunderchiefs were built; this version had a radar warning receiver added in 1966 and flare/chaff dispensers added in 1969. The F-105D Thunderstick II model improved the bombing sights and accuracy. The F-105E was a two seat trainer variant of the F-105D that was, as with the F-105C, never put into production. The EF-105F and EF-105G were the first Wild Weasel electronic warfare aircraft built; their job was to act as "SAM bait," and then knock out the SAM and radar sites with antiradiation missiles.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

F-105B

$527,542

AvG

6.35 tons

23.97 tons

1

22

None

Shielded

F-105D (Early)

$1,662,712

AvG

6.35 tons

23.85 tons

1

28

Radar

Shielded

F-105D (Late)

$1,695,613

AvG

6.35 tons

23.97 tons

1

28

Radar

Shielded

F-105D (T-Stick II)

$1,742,713

AvG

6.35 tons

23.97 tons

1

28

Radar

Shielded

EF-105F

$1,900,057

AvG

5.68 tons

25.09 tons

2

32

Radar

Shielded

EF-105G

$2,058,613

AvG

5.68 tons

25.09 tons

2

36

Radar

Shielded

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

F-105B

4391

1098 (150)

NA 274 4/2 40/20

4500

6161

12560

F-105D (All)

4474

1119 (150)

NA 280 4/2 40/20

4500

6475

12560

EF-105 (Both)

4360

1090 (150)

NA 273 4/2 40/20

4500

6464

12560

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

F-105B

None

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+1

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

1000x20mm

F-105D (Early)

None

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+2

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

1000x20mm

F-105D (Late)

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+2

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

1000x20mm

F-105D (T-Stick II)

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

1000x20mm

EF-105F

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+2

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints

1000x20mm

EF-105G

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, Deception Jamming, Active Jamming

1400/950m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan, 5 Hardpoints

1000x20mm

F-111 Aardvark

Notes: Despite the designation, this is not a fighter, but is in fact a medium bomber. It has variable geometry (swing) wings, which change the sweep angle automatically according to speed. The aircraft has four hardpoints and an internal bomb bay. In the F-111E, this normally carries up to 1.8 tons of weapons, or a 20mm Vulcan pod with 2084 rounds of ammunition; in the F-111F, this bay carries the Pave Tack pod, but the Pave Tack pod may be removed and internal weapons carried instead. If internal weapons only are carried, the weapons do not count when determining agility or turning. The F-111 uses an escape pod instead of ejection seats; the entire cockpit is ejected in an aerodynamic shell, and lowered on a parachute. This pod floats. The F-111 is capable of in-flight refueling and nuclear weapons delivery. In addition to the USAF, the Aardvark is used by Australia.

The F-111A was the first model. It had a checkered history, suffering several mysterious crashes during its first deployments to the Vietnam War. It was one of the first operational aircraft to use a variable-geometry ("swing") wing, allowing good performance at high and low speeds and a comparatively short takeoff and landing run. Compared to later Aardvarks, the F-11A was a relatively primitive aircraft, with unsophisticated ECM systems, bombsights that were heavily slaved to the radar (if performing radar or level bombing only, RF is +2), and the swing wing was not automatic. The F-111B was to be a naval interceptor version of this aircraft (the Phoenix missile was in fact originally designed for the F-111B), but this version was cancelled. The F-111C is the Australian Air Force version; it is an F-111A with the longer wings of the FB-111A, more hardpoints, a reinforced undercarriage, and upgraded radar, bomb delivery systems, and ECM. The F-111D has different engines, a flight computer that controls the swing wing and other flight functions, improved air-to-air capability, and a glass cockpit.

The F-111E, though later in the letter designation, came before the F-111D. It was a stopgap model, produced for use in Vietnam because the advanced avionics of the F-111D were not yet fully tested. The bombing system and ECM suite are better than the F-111A, but it is otherwise an A model.

The F-111F is an advanced D model. It has more powerful engines, and an advanced avionics suite including the Pave Tack system, which is an array of sensors, designators, and vision devices that grant great accuracy in bombing. No F-111Fs were lost in combat until late in the Twilight War.

The FB-111A is a strategic bomber variant of the F-111. It was supposed to bridge the gap between the B-52 and B-58 and the B-1, but the B-52 soldiered on and the B-58 left service. It has a longer fuselage and wings increased in span by over 2 meters, both to increase cruise range and allow the mounting of more hardpoints. The avionics were slightly better than that of the F-111E, but not as advanced as the F-111F. In addition, navigation and computing power was greater. The F-111G is an FB-111A converted to the tactical bombing role, with improved attack and avioncs systems.

The EF-111A Raven replaced the EB-66 electronic warfare aircraft. It is a conversion of the F-111A, with the addition of advanced electronic warfare systems. It does not carry weapons, and its hardpoints may mount electronic warfare equipment or drop tanks only.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

F-111A

$5,491472

AvG

13.64 tons

44.93 tons

2

50

Radar

Shielded

F-111C

$5,625,410

AvG

13.64 tons

45.03 tons

2

52

Radar

Shielded

F-111D

$6,334,823

AvG

13.64 tons

45.44 tons

2

52

Radar

Shielded

F-111E

$5,527,943

AvG

13.64 tons

45.04 tons

2

52

Radar

Shielded

F-111F

$7,263,572

AvG

14.23 tons

45.36 tons

2

48

Radar, (With Pave Tack) FLIR, Image Intensification

Shielded

F-111G

$7,466,306

AvG

17.05

53.2 tons

2

56

Radar

Shielded

FB-111A

$6,719,712

AvG

17.05 tons

54.21 tons

2

58

Radar

Shielded

EF-111A

$6,295,842

AvG

13.64 tons

40.39 tons

2

60

Radar

Shielded

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

F-111A/C/D/E, EF-111A

4650

1162 (105)

NA 291 5/3 50/35

19089

7689

20117

F-111F

5330

1333 (105)

NA 333 5/3 50/35

19089

13760

18290

FB-111A/F-111G

4650

1162 (105)

NA 291 5/3 50/35

18964

7861

15320

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

F-111A

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+1 or +2

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 6 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

2084x20mm (Optional)

F-111C

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+2

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 8 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

2084x20mm (Optional)

F-111D

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR, HUD Interface, Track While Scan, Auto Track

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 6 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

2084x20mm (Optional)

F-111E

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 6 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

2084x20mm (Optional)

F-111F

All-Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, HUD Interface, Auto Track, Track While Scan, TFR, (With Pave Tack) Laser Designator

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+3, (With Pave Tack) +4

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 6 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

(Optional) 2084x20mmM61

F-111G

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR, Auto Track, Track While Scan

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 8 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

(Optional) 2084x20mmM61

FB-111A

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

+3

20mm Vulcan (Optional), 8 Hardpoints, Internal Bomb Bay

2084x20mm (Optional)

EF-111A

All Weather Flight, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Radar Warning Receiver, ECM, TFR, Deception Jamming, Active Jamming, Radio Jamming, Chaff Rockets (4), HUD Interface

1400/1105m Hardened Runway

None

6 Hardpoints

None

F-117A Nighthawk

Notes: Known more commonly to the public as the Stealth Fighter, the Nighthawk is the first operational aircraft to exploit low observable stealth characteristics. All detection attempts with IR detection gear (including thermal, IR, or FLIR) are two levels more difficult than normal, and detection attempts with radar are four levels more difficult than normal. Guiding radar guided missiles against the aircraft are likewise four levels more difficult than normal, and IR missile home at three levels more difficult than normal. When the aircraft's bomb bay doors are open, radar attempts are only one level more difficult than normal. Known to some pilots as the Wobbly Goblin, the Nighthawk requires great skill by its pilots.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$19,878,459

AvG

2.27 tons

23.81 tons

1

48

Radar, FLIR

Shielded

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

2067

517 (150)

NA 129 4/2 40/20

4000

7598

11765

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

Radar Warning Receiver, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, ECM, IRCM, HUD, Look-Down Radar, Target ID, Terrain Following Radar

1200/1500m Primitive Runway

+5

2 Weapons Bays

None

OV-1E Mohawk

Notes: The OV-1E is the definitive version of the Mohawk, versions of which have been flying since 1959. The Mohawk flew more hours per airframe than any other aircraft in the 1991 Gulf War. The Echo model has more powerful 1800-horsepower engines, a GPS flight system, new avionics, and a new SLAR system. They are dual-purpose surveillance and ground-attack aircraft. The usual armament is a mix of M-2HB MG pods and 70mm rocket pods on the four free hardpoints.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,311,061

AvG

1.23 tons

8.21 tons

2

16

SLAR, FLIR

Enclosed

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

930

233 (120)

NA 58 7/4 45/35

930

472

7620

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

GPS, Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Secure Radios

744/615m Hardened Runway

+2

4 Hardpoints

None

OV-10 Bronco

Notes: This aircraft was designed for forward air controllers, helicopter escort, and light ground attack and counterinsurgency work. The OV-10 was originally used by the US Marines and Air Force, but by the outset of the Twilight War was used in the active duty role only by Thailand, Venezuela, Morocco, Philippines, Indonesia, and Oman. Retired by US forces in 1994, the Bronco returned late in the Twilight War as an attack aircraft when no other aircraft was available.

The OV-10D NOGS (Night Observation GunShip) version of the Bronco was used by the US as late as the Gulf War, and made a return late in the Twilight War. It has night vision gear and a 20mm gun turret in the belly, as well as uprated engines to cope with the added weight.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

OV-10A

$227,021

AvG

1.63 tons

6.55 tons

2+4

8

None

Enclosed

OV-10D

$549,054

AvG

2.4 tons

6.6 tons

2

10

FLIR, Passive IR

Enclosed

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

OV-10A/D

904

226 (90)

NA 57 9/6 60/45

955

523

7315

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

OV-10A

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Secure Radios

600/500 Primitive Runway

+2

4xM-2HB, 9 Hardpoints

2000x.50

OV-10D

Flare/Chaff Dispensers, Secure Radios, GPS, Laser Designator

600/500 Primitive Runway

+3

20mm M-197 Autocannon, 4 Hardpoints

1000x20mm

T-2 Buckeye

Notes: This was the US Navy and Marines' standard trainer before the introduction of the T-45 Goshawk, but some of them were recalled to duty during the Twilight War. It is also used by Venezuela and Greece, and was often used as a combat support aircraft during the Twilight War. Like most aircraft of its class, it is unsophisticated and light. Its two wingtip hardpoints may only be used for drop tanks. The T-2A is powered by a single engine; the T-2B has two smaller engines; the T-2C has two slightly less powerful engines.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

T-2A

$130,000 (R/-)

AvG

1.59 tons

5.66 tons

2

10

None

Enclosed

T-2B

$158,126

AvG

1.59 tons

6.19 tons

2

12

None

Enclosed

T-2C

$156,206

AvG

1.59 tons

5.98 tons

2

12

None

Enclosed

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

T-2A

1165

291 (100)

NA 73 6/3 60/30

2065

1508

10000

T-2B

1761

440 (100)

NA 110 6/3 60/30

2065

2672

12320

T-2C

1728

432 (100)

NA 108 6/3 60/30

2065

2627

12320

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

(All)

None

500/450m Hardened Runway

+1

6 hardpoints

None

T-34C Mentor

Notes: This basic trainer was used by many countries before the war as a COIN and FAC aircraft, and many US examples were armed during the war and used in the continental US to fight Mexican and New American forces. It is an improved version of the civilian Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft, with hardpoints added, and the piston engine replaced by a turboprop. The Mentor is actually able to use Maverick missiles, in addition to bombs, rocket pods, and machinegun pods. This aircraft, in addition to the US, is in use by many countries in Latin America, the Pacific Rim, and Africa. The Mentor has no ejection seats and is not capable on in-flight refueling. The T-34 is the base model; the T-34A and B are identical, but built for the Air Force and Navy respectively. The T-34C Turbo Mentor is equipped with a much more powerful engine.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

T-34

$31,136

AvG

408 kg

1.25 tons

2

4

None

Enclosed

T-34A/B

$31,298

AvG

427 kg

1.32 tons

2

4

None

Enclosed

T-34C

$35,136

AvG

534 kg

1.95 tons

2

4

None

Enclosed

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

T-34

540

135 (95)

NA 34 6/3 60/30

450

74

6465

T-34A/B

556

139 (50)

NA 35 6/3 60/30

450

74

6465

T-34C

792

198 (50)

NA 50 6/3 60/30

450

139

9145

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

(All)

None

600/500m Primitive Runway

None

4 hardpoints

None